8 Interesting And Unexpected Facts About The Film Don Camillo

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Don Camillo curiosities
Terence Hill starred in, produced, and directed the Italian comedy Don Camillo, which was created in 1983 and released in 1984. In the movie’s premise, the opposing communist mayor Peppone (Colin Blakely) and the local priest Don Camillo (Terence Hill) frequently clash, dividing the peaceful life of the town. Even a football game is organized by the two ostensibly opposing parties to demonstrate whose camp is larger and more powerful. The residents of the split town test the tenacity of their beliefs in the pivotal football match as the conflict between angels and demons reaches a bloody conclusion—or at least, nearly does. In our compilation below, you can read some interesting facts about this film that you may not have heard about yet.

1) This film is a modern adaptation of the film The Little World of Don Camillo, made in 1951 and released in 1952.
2) The screenplay for the live-action feature film was written by Terence Hill’s wife, Lori Hill, whom he married in 1967.

3) This was the first film in which Terence Hill tried his hand as a director. In addition, he directed the productions Lucky Luke, Bunyó until Christmas and Nevem: Thomas. The latter was shot in memory of his friend and fellow actor Bud Spencer.
4) Many people are unaware of Terence Hill’s adoption of Ross Hill, who is his son. Three years after making his cinematic debut in Don Camillo in 1984, Ross took part in The Hardhead’s production, playing the part of Matt. He was supposed to play Billy the kid in the 1991 film Lucky Luke, but sadly, real life got in the way. He was involved in a tragic car accident on January 30, 1990, and tragically, he did not survive.

5) There are three Hungarian dubbing versions of Don Camillo, all of which feature Terence Hill in the voice of László Újréti. By the way, Újréti is the most common Hungarian voice, in most of his films (not counting the roles he played under the name Mario Girotti) he dubs, or at least there is a Hungarian version made with him. In fact, some films have both – Don Camillo has all three! – in the dubbing version, he lends his voice to Hill. In 2002, it was revealed in a TV2 report about the re-dubbing that in the films where Terence Hill was young, he did not accept the dubbing due to his hoarse voice (re-dubbing was done the year before with Zoltán Rátóti).
6) It was shown in cinemas in France on February 8, 1984, in Italy on March 2, in Hungary – as already mentioned – three dubbed versions were made, the first of which was released on June 12, 1995 on VHS, the second on TV2 on December 30, 2001, and the third on M2 on December 26, 2006.

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7) The unauthorized footballers in the film were also footballers in real life, not unknown. For example, a certain Carlo Ancelotti was one of the assistants at the Devils.
8) There are several connections between Don Matteo and Don Camillo, a later series by Terence Hill. Terence Hill and Gastone Moschin, who play the two main characters in the Don Matteo series, have an odd link because this is not the first time they have been on TV as priests. Both actors played the fabled Don Camillo. In the 1972 movie Don Camillo e i giovani d’oggi (Don Camillo and today’s youth), Moschin portrayed the priest. The sixth installment of Fernandel’s Don Camillo series was planned to be shot in 1970, but owing to Fernandel’s illness and passing, that picture was left unfinished, and Moschin filled the character in the 1972 version. In our current movie, Terence Hill portrayed the amazing priest.

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