My Hungarian Fans Are The Dearest – Terence Hill

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He takes Saint Francis of Assisi as an example, never agrees to play a villain, and has two adopted children in addition to his own. Terence Hill believes that everyone should have a personal relationship with God and has, according to his own admission, long been a practitioner of regard for divine mercy. The 84-year-old actor Levente Király’s book Zsugabubus is jam-packed with inspirational ideas and tales.

He is a deeply religious man, whose role model is Saint Francis of Assisi, and for years he has had a deep respect for divine mercy. Terence Hill rarely talks about his faith and religious upbringing, which he owes to his father. Levente Király’s new book, Zsugabubus, however, has many uplifting thoughts for readers. Among other things, it also reveals that the actor, as a devout Catholic, almost always read to his children from the book The Flower Garden of St. Francis of Assisi, reports Magyar Nemzet. From the book Zsugabubus, readers can not only learn about the film career of the hilarious Italian comedian, but also gain a deeper insight into the personality and life of one of the most reclusive actors in the world.

My father read me a book on Saint Francis when I was a child. My hero is him. Since then, I have been a believer. I rarely discuss faith because it is a treasured and deeply personal subject for me. So, my relationship with religion is very personal; it is joyful, serious, and occasionally even angry. These kinds of relationships are difficult to discuss because they are always evolving, in my opinion. I think that everyone has a connection to God in some way. You must have a close relationship with her. I have been putting my regard for divine mercy into practice for many years.

– says Terence Hill, who never took on roles that he felt were against his principles and Christian values. Few people know that he was also offered the role of John Rambo, but he said no, but he was also asked for other similar roles, which did not become a worldwide success.

“When a very powerful film producer called me for the role of a rapist and threatened to ruin my career if I didn’t say yes, I knew it was time to go. It means a lot to me that I am an actor, but only as I imagine”

– believes the actor, who has never accepted the role of a villain or a simple bad guy.

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“How weak we are that we cannot cope with the truth! We want entertainment, not truth. We must be like the captain of a sailing ship. We are not the wind. We are just the sailors. We can use all our strength to keep the ship on course, but we are not the force of the wind. I made professional decisions that others thought were unwise. I turned down a lot of money, but I was happy. That’s why I can be authentic today as Father Matteo”

– says Hill, who lives his Christian faith not only as a private person, but also in films. Terence Hill played the role of a priest for the first time in 1983 in the film Don Camillo, and then in 2000 the very successful Don Matteo series began, with Terence Hill playing the title role.

He and his wife, Lori Hill, decided to adopt another boy after Ross (who died in a car accident in 1990 at the age of 16). About this he says

“adoption is not an accurate term. This is a topic I don’t want to talk too much about. Speculating about these things and promoting yourself seems tasteless to me. I can tell you that my wife and I adopted little Mani Wong, a boy from Thailand, who is eight years old today, at the moment when we were honored to be able to provide for his financial security for the rest of his life.”

Mani’s parents and their kids are in a difficult situation, which is why one of their kids ended up staying at a facility. By the way, the actor does not completely discount the possibility that this child would someday actually join their family. Terence Hill has already traveled to Hungary on multiple occasions, most notably for a charity event and to promote his movie My Name: Thomas. At the time, Terence Hill spoke on his experiences in Hungary, saying,

“In Hungary, I have found that wherever I go, my Hungarian fans are the most discreet, the kindest and the most polite, the best educated. Elsewhere, people are shouting around me, wanting to touch me. In Budapest, on the other hand, I felt that the Hungarians were looking after me, and that is a very good feeling. They don’t rush down. I hope to be able to come back here.”

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