Surprising Interesting Facts About The Movie Aladdin By Bud Spencer

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1985 was quite a sad year for fans of the Bud Spencer-Terence Hill films: The Super Heroes was the pair’s last film together, and we saw them together again only after a break of almost 10 years, until 1994’s Bunyó Christmas. In the meantime, however, both actors shot a lot of better solo films – which always lacked their familiar other half. This was also the case with the 1986 film Aladdin, in which the lamp-dwelling genie (Bud Spencer) known from The Thousand and One Nights fulfills his master’s wishes, and this causes all kinds of trouble. In our compilation below, you can find out some behind-the-scenes secrets about this film.

1. The film is directed by no less a director than Bruno Corbucci, the younger brother of the master of spaghetti westerns, Sergio Corbucci. He wrote and directed The Super Heroes, but he also wrote And We’re Angry Again, Banana Joe, Robber Cop and Terence Hill’s I’m His Gun, so like his brother, he’s also worked quite a bit with our favorite slappers.
2. It is interesting that Aladdin was one of the first VICO films in Hungary in 1989, because the company owner János Fenyő loved the Bud Spencer-Terence Hill classics and released quite a few films from the duo’s oeuvre on yellow tape.

3. By the way, until 1992, Fenyő released better and better films on his characteristic yellow video cassettes – mostly without the knowledge of the original rights holders. His method was ridiculously simple: he ran out to East Germany, bought all the films released on laserdisc that he could find in the first shopping center on his way, and copied them onto as many cassettes as he could at home. In 1992, however, his wrongdoings were revealed, and after three years of litigation, he was awarded $100,000 in damages to 20th Century Fox and Columbia studios, which forced him to give up the illegal tape business. It’s strange, but the company of the Golan-Globus production duo, Cannon, never sued Feny, and the Bud Spencers didn’t go after the cassette king, who was murdered in 1998, even though until ’92 the VICO company released a lot of Bud Spencer and Terence Hill films. suspected to be illegal.

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4. One of Bud Spencer’s daughters, Diamante, also appears in the film. Cristiana Pedersoli (left) and Diamante (right), daughters of Bud Spencer
5. It was shown in cinemas in Italy on December 23, 1986, in Hungary on June 30, 1988, with a new Hungarian version on TV3 on May 30, 1998.
6. Of course, it shouldn’t be a challenge for Bud Spencer to conjure up a Rolls-Royce from scratch. The Silver Cloud II type is featured here as well, just like in No Two in Four, except that they also fly between skyscrapers with it…

7. In Aladdin, we can admire another old timer car. Tony, the very likeable antiques dealer, has a 1950s Chevrolet pickup with a large American flag on the door. It is certain that it is from the Advance Design series: it could have been 3100 or even 3600.
8. It is particularly interesting that Bud Spencer was voiced by both legendary Hungarian voices for the sake of the film. In the first Hungarian version (MOKÉP, 1988) it is sung by István Bujtor, while in the second (TV3, 1998) it is sung by Lajos Kránitz.

 

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