The Devil’s Right And Left Hand: This Is How One Of The Best Bud Spencer And Terence Hill Films Was Realized

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Although director Giuseppe Colizzi dreamed up and realized the Bud Spencer-Terence Hill pair, it was E. B. Clucher (originally known as Enzo Barboni – editor) who first recognized their untapped potential. He did all this by emphasizing the differences between them, but in a comedic way. From Levente Király’s new book, The Unbeatable Couple, we can also learn how one of the legendary Italian couple’s best films, The Devil’s Right and Left Hand, was made.

At that time, producer Italo Zingarelli carefully read every script, including the text of this film, which he immediately liked.

“I think it is very important to say that Enzo Barboni was a fantastic person with a unique sense of irony. Ultimately, we cannot say that the script embodied the western, but it approached it with irony, and my father read it through the lens of irony. He was an absolute pacifist, and this story was finally not full of corpses. Anyway, he always liked to take risks, he liked challenges. Because it was a challenge for him, which he really liked.”

– notes the producer’s daughter, Sandra Zingarelli. Right and Left Hand of the Devil was Franco Micalizzi’s first opportunity to write film music. For a long time, the script lay in the producers’ drawer, which was passed from hand to hand, but no one wanted to deal with it, because there was no blood in the fights, the scenes were more funny than violent.

“It might have seemed scary, because on the other side there was Sergio Leone, whose films had quite a lot of blood. Then the producer, Italo Zingarelli, had the courage and desire to do it. Maybe he understood – because he was intelligent, but I don’t know and I don’t think he knew – that it would become such a successful film. And I knew him, he came to me to let’s do it. I said ok, let’s do it. A door opened for me then, and I am grateful for this opportunity. I believe that if the train comes, you should get on it. And this was a very cool train: a real Orient Express.

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Said the composer of the work.
Barboni took the script to Zingarelli, who was under contract with Bud Spencer and Terence Hill, with whom he had previously shot.

“They were just looking for a new story, but the one they were thinking about at the time somehow didn’t convince them, and my father then took this story to Zingarelli. This is a wonderful coincidence, hence the wonder of the film. The team was assembled in a very short time, many factors came together fortunately. They were already there, they didn’t like the previous script, and Zingarelli was a very intuitive person who could exploit the potential of this story. My father saw this script, which had been rejected by so many producers before him, and immediately said yes. If he had taken a little more time with the previous film, then Zingarelli would not have been free, and neither would the actors, because they might have chosen a different film by then.”

Recalls Marco Tullio Barboni, the director’s son. It is particularly interesting that during the filming of the film, English had to be spoken throughout, and since the Italian actors did not handle the foreign language quite well, they had to attend English lessons every day.

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