This Is The Film That Is Considered Bud Spencer’S Most Personal Piece

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No Two Without Four was released in 1984 and was Bud Spencer and Terence Hill’s 15th film together. The film can be considered a real “family” production, since the screenwriter Marco Barboni worked together with his father, the director Enzo Barboni. According to the story, Greg and Eliot take on a really strange job. For $1 million each, they have to replace a millionaire brother and sister from Rio, who are receiving more and more death threats.

Of course, the job seems easy, since Greg and Eliot are exact replicas of the brothers, but the problems start when they actually try to commit an assassination against them, and of course there is quite a bit of confusion when the elegant and somewhat squeamish millionaire brothers suddenly turn into two capable, hard-nosed couples.

No two without four is probably one of the most memorable parts of the Spencer-Hill films, not to mention that the plot of the film is more real than we might think. To this day, the montage technique with which they managed to double the couple on the cinema screen is impressively authentic, and although they used doubles in many scenes, perhaps even the most perceptive would not be able to tell when we are not seeing the real Bud Spencer and Terence Hill on the cinema screen.

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In reality, the two actors actually received 1 million dollars each, just like the characters they portrayed in the film, and in reality, Bud Spencer could play the saxophone just as talented as Greg. However, the story does not end, because in one of the scenes of the film, when he says on one of the banana plantations that he had been to Brazil before, when he was looking for diamonds along the Rio Negro, well, in reality, Spencer actually worked in the country, namely at the Italian consulate.

According to the plot of the film, the agency that approaches Greg and Eliot reveals that they are not the first to be asked to stand in for others, since the President of the United States of America is also a Hollywood actor, and this was not far from reality, since at the time US President Ronald Reagan actually started his career as a film actor in the 1940s.

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